Culture Minister Katoch to Opend Renovated Decorative Arts Gallery of National Museum

The National Museum will get further enriched with a grand set of colorful and ornate artifacts, as a renovated gallery of decorative arts will be inaugurated tomorrow, showcasing some prized specimens of tasteful design and decoration of objects of utility in the 18th and 19th century.

Union Minister of Culture, Smt Chandresh Kumari Katoch, will formally open the revamped gallery that would display a fascinating set of historical objects crafted for daily, ceremonial and religious uses from a variety of materials like ivory, jade and ceramic.

Showcasing some prized specimens of tasteful design and decoration of objects of utility in the 18th and 19th century.Union Minister of Culture, Smt Chandresh Kumari Katoch, will formally open the revamped gallery that would display a fascinating set of historical objects crafted for daily, ceremonial and religious uses from a variety of materials like ivory, jade and “Each medium is represented by a group of seven or eight showcases to portray the diverse nature of artefacts and high quality of craftsmanship,” National Museum Director-General Dr V Venu noted.
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The Ivory group highlights boxes, sandals, utilitarian artefacts and images of Hindu and Christian religious figures, while the Jade section showcases the utilitarian. The ceramic group, which comprises glazed tiles, blue-white pottery and celadon items, is being displayed for the first time, he revealed.The gallery, which comes back to life after a gap of seven years, profiles two themes: leisure/ancient games and the ‘throne story’. These have been developed with the help of artefacts made of various materials, besides the main three Some of the country’s finest examples of leisure and ancient-games traditions are depicted in the form of dancers, musicians, rattles, yo-yo, gamesmen of chess and gyan chaupar besides tops made of ivory, bone, jade, glass beads, wood and metal.

As for ‘throne story’, it indicates the evolution of the seat of power.  “From the low and flat seats of antiquity to the modern armed chair, the journey of the throne is a fascinating story,” notes Dr Venu.For instance, the section features a huge yet intricately-carved home shrine and some metal pitikas (small seats for keeping idols for home shrines ). Further, there are a couple of stone thrones, and a jewel-studded chair of the King of Banaras. Some outstanding pieces have been displayed against the four pillars — such as ‘The Meditating Buddha’ inside a lattice case and  Dashavatar shrine depicting ten incarnations of Lord Vishnu made of ivory. Then, there is the clothpainted gyan chaupar, a silver tray depicting Kaurava’s court scene, five-foot elephant tusk carved with life scenes of Lord Buddha, a jade surahi, armrest,  chauri and the huqqa  inscribed with the name of Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the white-blue

 

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